Just Because You’re Psychic Doesn’t Mean You Should Be a Know-It-All

If you’re psychic, how much of the story do you really know when you’ve seen only a flash of something?  What do you disclose…and what do you interpret through your own filters?  Photo of Lorna Tedder by Ais Portraits

Yep, I believe in psychics. Definitely.  I’ve had enough of my own otherwise inexplicable coincidences,  and several of my church members, friends, and colleagues have “the sight” with a high degree of accuracy.  I’m not talking about “Oh, a man’s coming into your life and it may be romantic or just friends and he may have brownish or blondish hair and I think his name might begin with a J or maybe an M or, well, it could be a T or an S, and I think you may already know him. Does that sound familiar?”  By accurate, I mean something more akin to this:  “There’s a major new romance coming into your life in exactly 18 months.   He’s extremely tall and muscular, dresses like Paul Bunyan, and can always make you laugh, no matter what.   There’s a small child in his life but he doesn’t live with her–she may be a niece or god-daughter.  He’s been out of his last committed relationship for [time period] when you first meet.  Likes boots and belt buckles and wears flannel plaid shirts sometimes.  He was born on _____.  Oh, yeah, and his first name is _____.”    Nothing like a psychic who’s good and gives you specifics!

Unfortunately, you may not be asking for those specifics–or about potential relationships.  Or what if you’re happy in your current relationship and not looking for a new one?  How would you feel about an accurate psychic stirring up your emotions with projections of that sort?  What if you didn’t ask at all, but just got a load of upsetting possible futures dumped on you by a stranger?

I’m all for people nurturing their talents, especially metaphysical talents, but there’s a type of arrogance that some gifted psychics have that can cause great harm.  It’s not even meant to cause harm and the psychic usually doesn’t consider himself or herself full of ego.  In fact, it’s often the opposite.  It’s a firm belief that possession of a psychic gift means they’re on a mission to deliver whatever message they’re given by their Gods, angels, spirits, etc.  It’s often done with pure intentions, and because it is,  the psychic often will not take responsibility for the damage that’s done.  “It’s in God’s hands,” he’ll say.  Or, “I’m just the messenger.”  Or, “If I’m not supposed to deliver the message, I won’t see it in the first place.”

Over the years, I’ve parted company with several friends who were gifted intuitives–and some who were not–for this very reason.  Unsolicited or ill-delivered psychic advice.  One of the most painful pre-parting messages was, in the long run, 100% accurate in the seeing of it, but the message was delivered 3 years too early, and caused a lot of destruction, largely because the psychic was told specifically to stay out of it.  Another was 100% accurate, also, in the seeing of it but misinterpreted the reason for the events, and again…she was specifically told to stay out of it.  Once said, some words will always stick with you, eat at you, but nothing like the unsolicited advice of someone who frequently sees the future and can’t keep it to themselves.

One of the first times I was exposed to author Carolyn Myss’ work, it was probably close to ten years ago.  She’d spoken in a workshop or interview about how gifted intuitives needed to–pardon the paraphrasing–mind their own business and not go spewing advice to strangers without knowing how it would affect that stranger.  I took it then as a matter of being responsible with such a gift.  One of my intuitive friends was critical of Myss’  comments, saying that if the gift is from God, then the psychic has a mission to tell that person, no matter the results.

A lot of time has passed since then, and I’ve come to agree with Myss.   It’s bad enough getting too much advice from friends and family and even strangers when you’re trying to get back on your feet emotionally after a difficult couple of decades, but when those friends, family,and strangers are psychic and their advice becomes an emotional rollercoaster of negative possibilities you hadn’t considered, the best you can do is hide in a cave and not answer your cell phone when they call to tell you about their latest dream what might make you unhappy.

So for those of you are truly are gifted, I am pleased that you’ve been blessed (or–I suppose–cursed, depending on how you look at it) and that you have this inner guidance to give yourself and to those who ask.  But please, let us ask for it instead of shaping our reality without being invited to participate in the process.  Don’t just grab a stranger off the street and blab what you see when you have no frame of reference for it.  We may prefer to work through the process alone without your interference, and if God really wants us to know the message we don’t want to hear or don’t want to hear from you, then the message will find us without you.  You are, after all, one of many conduits and the best conduit is our own intuition.
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